PROJECT:  THE VILLAGE
LOCATION:  PNIEL, CAPE WINELANDS 
PHOTOGRAPHIC/IMAGERY CREDITS: W LE ROUX

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47 SDP1

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IMG_6975

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Untitled_Artwork 1

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It was important to retain the dominance of agriculture in the existing historic cultural landscape, thereby establishing a settlement with rural urban and authentic village qualities that detract from typical examples of suburbia and security estates and that design qualities contribute to the creation of an authentic village.

The typical development model resulting in gated, suburban, housing estates on green-field sites is widely regarded as undesirable in terms of good place making. The intention of the urban design was to avoid this type of model, by delivering on what is expected to constitute a new benchmark in sustainable development and excellent place making in the wine lands area of the Cape.

 

In pursuing a philosophy of sustainable development, the village adheres to three important principles: social, economic and environmental sustainability.

 

1. Social sustainability manifested by:

•             provision of public good

•             promotion of social cohesion and diversity in communities

•             delivering healthy living environments.

 

2. Economic sustainability to be found in:

•             support for the local economy

•             the creation of local jobs

•             forging symbiotic economic systems

3. Environmental sustainability:

•             reducing C02 emissions

•             avoiding greenfield development

•             promoting density and reducing sprawl

•             reducing waste

 

Within the context of a rural village, the design embraces the quality of urbanism rather than that of sub-urbanism. It is applied at the full range of scales from a single building to an entire community, without losing its village character.

In essence, the character of the proposed development will be that of rural village, characterised by certain urban qualities, discreetly knitted into an agrarian landscape, whilst responding to the historical context of the area.

The Village urban design was done in partnership with Philip Briel.